Join GVSHP staff member Dana Schulz as she takes you on a journey through the East Village, peeling back the layers of the cultural gastronomy scene that have made this neighborhood so eclectic (and delicious!) over the years. Explore how immigrant groups established restaurants to serve their own community as well as share their heritage with the uninitiated. Learn the little-known facts that make these spots famous and infamous and discover how the emerging food scene of today reflects the changing culture of the neighborhood. Stops will include John’s of 12th Street, Moishe’s Bakery, and the Big Gay Ice Cream Shop. Food samples are not included, but you’ll surely have some good dining ideas!

 

Time: 11:00am-12:30pm

Date: Monday May 23, 2012

Event Start/End: TBD

Hosts: The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP)

Registration: Limit of 30 participants. Register by emailing rsvp@gvshp.org or by calling 212-475-9585 x35

Accessibility: Fully Accessible – children and seniors welcome.

The BROADWAY: 1000 Steps Baton – 240th Street to 190th Street: Bronx Gateway Through Inwood to Manhattan

Artist and Founder of City as Living Laboratory, Mary Miss, will inaugurate the event by addressing the significance of Broadway, as Manhattan’s historic and ever-evolving corridor. Bronx-born artist, Daniel Hauben, will discuss his impressions of the borough, past and present, which serve as the subject of his acclaimed ‘landscape’ paintings, while Inwood resident and enthusiast, Don Rice, will enrich this stretch of the walk with interesting historical anecdotes of Inwood’s enchanting and obscure past.

BROADWAY: 1000 Steps is a project by Mary Miss to turn the oldest avenue of NYC into a “green corridor” where insights into our surroundings – from streets and buildings, to transportation and waste, to energy and the climate – can be made apparent and accessible at ground level. This project, to be inaugurated next spring 2013, will be implemented at up to twenty “hubs” dispersed along its length, from the Bronx to the Battery. Each hub will serve as a site for installations that reveal the urban infrastructure, decode the environment and suggest what the future city might be. This project is intended as a catalyst for interventions and projects by other artists, environmental designers, and citizens along Broadway, at additional sites in NYC and cities across the country.

NOTE: This walk is part of a continuous series of walks taking place on Sunday, May 5th. To view the other events in the “BROADWAY: 1000 Steps” walk series, view the Upper Manhattan and Lower Manhattan walk pages.

 

Time: 8:00am-10:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: The intersection of Broadway and Van Cortlandt Park South

Event End: Broadway, between 190th and 189th St., next to Gorman Park

Hosts: Mary Miss, Gabriel Willow, Daniel Hauben, Don Rice

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

The BROADWAY: 1000 Steps Baton – 190th Street to 112th Street: Newcomers and Old Timers: Fort George, Washington Heights and Harlem

Acclaimed artist, Matthew Jensen, will heighten awareness of this area’s topography and geology, addressing features of the urban landscape often unnoticed. CB9 community activist Linda Walton will help to identify landmarks of Harlem’s cultural history over time and provide projections for the neighborhood’s future. As we walk past the prolific Columbia University, environmental scientists Sabine Marx will speak about the work of the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions.

BROADWAY: 1000 Steps is a project by Mary Miss to turn the oldest avenue of NYC into a “green corridor” where insights into our surroundings – from streets and buildings, to transportation and waste, to energy and the climate – can be made apparent and accessible at ground level. This project, to be inaugurated next spring 2013, will be implemented at up to twenty “hubs” dispersed along its length, from the Bronx to the Battery. Each hub will serve as a site for installations that reveal the urban infrastructure, decode the environment and suggest what the future city might be. This project is intended as a catalyst for interventions and projects by other artists, environmental designers, and citizens along Broadway, at additional sites in NYC and cities across the country.

NOTE: This walk is part of a continuous series of walks taking place on Sunday, May 5th. To view the other events in the “BROADWAY: 1000 Steps” walk series, view the Upper Manhattan and Lower Manhattan walk pages.

 

Time: 10:00am-12:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: Broadway, between 190th and 189th St., next to Gorman Park

Event End: The intersection of Broadway and 112th St., in front of Tom’s Restaurant

Hosts: Matthew Jensen, Linda Walton, Sabine Marx

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

The BROADWAY: 1000 Steps Baton – 112th Street to 59th Street: Central Park to Columbus Circle

As we walk down from 112th St., Angelica Pasqualini of Columbia University’s Center for Climate Systems research, will speak about the principle climate research underway in NYC and the myriad green innovations in the built environment that line Broadway.

BROADWAY: 1000 Steps is a project by Mary Miss to turn the oldest avenue of NYC
into a “green corridor” where insights into our surroundings – from streets and buildings, to transportation and waste, to energy and the climate – can be made apparent and accessible at ground level. This project, to be inaugurated next spring 2013, will be implemented at up to twenty “hubs” dispersed along its length, from the Bronx to the Battery. Each hub will serve as a site for installations that reveal the urban infrastructure, decode the environment and suggest what the future city might be. This project is intended as a catalyst for interventions and projects by other artists, environmental designers, and citizens along Broadway, at additional sites in NYC and cities across the country.

NOTE: This walk is part of a continuous series of walks taking place on Sunday, May 5th. To view the other events in the “BROADWAY: 1000 Steps” walk series, view the Upper Manhattan and Lower Manhattan walk pages.

 

Time: 12:00pm-2:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: The intersection of Broadway and 112th St., in front of Tom’s Restaurant

Event End: 59th St. and Broadway; Columbus Circle entrance to Central Park

Host: Angelica Pasqualini

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

East Harlem: Gentrification and the Historic New Harlem

East Harlem is a very old neighborhood. Its tenements, public housing, and the current boom in condos now creates a new mix of people. In the past Harlem was home to Chinese, Italian, African American, Sephardic Jew, Spanish, Carribean, Mexican and Latin American residents. Now there is a smattering of persons from Mali, Burkina Faso, Egypt, India, Russia, Senegal, Gambia and Ethiopia. The area is undergoing gentrification so now East Harlem sees and hear a population that formerly lived south of East 96th St., the unofficial dividing line between the inner city residents and the upper middle class. Explore this change with Dr. Sandra Hernandez, East Harlem expert native.

 

Time: 11:00am-1:00pm

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Event Start: Corner of 103rd St. and Lexington Ave.

Event End: 116th St. and Lexington Ave.

Host: Dr. Sandra Hernandez, of the Architect Designer Planners for Social Responsibility

Registration: No need to sign up, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Not Accessible – stairs, obstacles, uneven terrain, steep paths

The BROADWAY: 1000 Steps Baton - 59th Street to 23rd Street: Midtown Through the Square

Vin Cipolla, president of the Municipal Art Society (MAS), will guide us from Columbus Circle to Times Square—historic junctions along Broadway where MAS has played a critical role boosting the corridor’s assets. The Times Square Alliance will also be on hand to speak more specifically about Times Square’s cultural relevance and the plans in place to improve the area. Broadway Green Alliance will address its own initiatives regarding greening of the theater district.

BROADWAY: 1000 Steps is a project by Mary Miss to turn the oldest avenue of NYC into a “green corridor” where insights into our surroundings – from streets and buildings, to transportation and waste, to energy and the climate – can be made apparent and accessible at ground level. This project, to be inaugurated next spring 2013, will be implemented at up to twenty “hubs” dispersed along its length, from the Bronx to the Battery. Each hub will serve as a site for installations that reveal the urban infrastructure, decode the environment and suggest what the future city might be. This project is intended as a catalyst for interventions and projects by other artists, environmental designers, and citizens along Broadway, at additional sites in NYC and cities across the country.

NOTE: This walk is part of a continuous series of walks taking place on Sunday, May 5th. To view the other events in the “BROADWAY: 1000 Steps” walk series, view the Upper Manhattan and Lower Manhattan walk pages.

 

Time: 2:00pm-4:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: 59th St. and Broadway; Columbus Circle entrance to Central Park

Event End: The intersection of Broadway and 23rd, on the South-West corner of Madison Square Park

Host: Vin Cipolla, President of the Municipal Art Society of New York

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

The BROADWAY: 1000 Steps Baton – 23rd Street to Canal Street: The Downtown Area

Max Joel, the Director of Energy Connections at alternative energy organization, Solar One, will address their bold environmental initiatives, followed by naturalist and educator, Gabriel Willow, who will turn our attention to the natural habitat of the neighborhood beginning with Madison Square Park.

BROADWAY: 1000 Steps is a project by Mary Miss to turn the oldest avenue of NYC into a “green corridor” where insights into our surroundings – from streets and buildings, to transportation and waste, to energy and the climate – can be made apparent and accessible at ground level. This project, to be inaugurated next spring 2013, will be implemented at up to twenty “hubs” dispersed along its length, from the Bronx to the Battery. Each hub will serve as a site for installations that reveal the urban infrastructure, decode the environment and suggest what the future city might be. This project is intended as a catalyst for interventions and projects by other artists, environmental designers, and citizens along Broadway, at additional sites in NYC and cities across the country.

NOTE: This walk is part of a continuous series of walks taking place on Sunday, May 5th. To view the other events in the “BROADWAY: 1000 Steps” walk series, view the Upper Manhattan and Lower Manhattan walk pages.

 

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: 23rd St. and Broadway

Event End: Canal St. and Broadway

Host: Max Joel

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

The BROADWAY: 1000 Steps Baton – Canal Street to Bowling Green: The Origins of the City

Community activist and Professor of Planning, Michael Levine, will reveal the rapidly changing demographic and environmental trends of Lower Manhattan, while chair of the CB1 Financial District Committee, Ro Shaffe, will share his deep knowledge of the area’s history that has given way to its current conditions. Wellington Chen, Director of the Chinatown Partnership, will speak about the prolific history of Chinatown area and discuss the current social and environmental challenges of this focal community. Annaline Dinkelmann, founder of Wall Street Walks, will share her knowledge about the history of the Financial District, dating all the way back to Manhattan’s Dutch settlers.

BROADWAY: 1000 Steps is a project by Mary Miss to turn the oldest avenue of NYC into a “green corridor” where insights into our surroundings – from streets and buildings, to transportation and waste, to energy and the climate – can be made apparent and accessible at ground level. This project, to be inaugurated next spring 2013, will be implemented at up to twenty “hubs” dispersed along its length, from the Bronx to the Battery. Each hub will serve as a site for installations that reveal the urban infrastructure, decode the environment and suggest what the future city might be. This project is intended as a catalyst for interventions and projects by other artists, environmental designers, and citizens along Broadway, at additional sites in NYC and cities across the country.

NOTE: This walk is part of a continuous series of walks taking place on Sunday, May 5th. To view the other events in the “BROADWAY: 1000 Steps” walk series, view the Upper Manhattan and Lower Manhattan walk pages.

 

Time: 6:00pm-8:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: The intersection of Broadway and Lispenard, one block South of Canal

Event End: Bowling Green

Host: Michael Levine, Ro Schaffe, Wellington Chen, Margaret Sagan

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

This walk, beginning at the former home of Jane Jacobs, will discuss what could have happened to the area if she had not defeated Robert Moses in building a Lower Manhattan Expressway, urban density and diversity (which Jacobs was highly in favor of), and will look at the type of “sidewalk ballet” that Jacobs viewed from her window.

 

 

 

Time: 2:00pm-4:00pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: 555 Hudson Street, Manhattan

Event End: Below the High Line

Host: Marty Schneit, of Marty’s New York Tours

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Walk of Catherine Slip Streetscape Approaching the East River Blueway

Join the Lower East Side Ecology Center Education Director, Dan Tainow, to learn about the improvements to the streetscape that are happening along the lower section of the East River Blueway. We will look at what has been built and discuss what could be built to improve parkland, water quality and access to the East River Blueway.

Click here for more information on this walk.

 

Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Event Start: 80 Catherine Slip (in front of P.S. 126/MAT), New York, NY 10038

Event End: Smith Park, next to 80 Catherine Slip at the GreenDay 2012 event

Host: Lower East Side Ecology Center

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks

Take an epic three-mile walk bookended by two iconic New York public spaces: Times Square and the High Line. Along the way, we’ll highlight public plazas, safer street crossings, transit corridors and protected bike lanes—all situated in the midst of New York City’s unique architecture. We’ll stroll past the house where Jane Jacobs wrote The Death and Life of Great American Cities and end with refreshments at Gansevoort Plaza.

Transportation Alternatives is working to revitalize New York City’s neighborhoods and restore a vibrant culture of street life. This walk features some of the many communities where T.A. advocacy brings safe and healthy streets for all.

 

Time: 8:15am-11:30am

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Event Start: Broadway and West 47th Street – TKTS steps

Event End: Gansevoort Plaza, Little West 12th Street and 9th Avenue

Hosts: Transportation Alternatives, Clinton Hell’s Kitchen Coalition for Pedestrian Safety, Jim Braddock (Mitchell/Giurgola Architects), Friends of the High Line

Registration: RSVP (capacity constraints in place at the High Line): http://transalt.org/events/calendar/5808

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Lower Main Street in Tottenville became an important business center in the mid-19th c. with the revitalization of the oyster industry enhanced by the extension of the SI Railroad to Tottenville in 1860. Capt. John Totten, who lived nearby & whose house still stands, built a dock and general store along the waterfront here, and the maritime industries that supported that industry soon flourished. A century later, Main St. remained at the heart of the community’s business district, providing a wide range of services from banking to shoe repair.

Today, the mom-and-pop stores have all but disappeared, and Main St. struggles in tough economic times. What does the future hold for small town centers like Main Street, Tottenville?

 

Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start/End: Tottenville train station (last stop on the Staten Island Railway)

Hosts: Tottenville Historical Society

Registration: Please RSVP: 646-291-7005 or at http://bit.ly/IK7opO

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Flushing, Queens: The Rocket Thrower – Robert Moses, the 1964/65 World’s Fair, and Art in the Space Age

The Space Age was a time of bewildering change, yet also of great optimism about the future. Conceived at a time of general consensus in 1958 and designed to celebrate and promote the U.S. entry into the Space Age, the 1964/65 Fair opened instead amidst the turbulent conflicts of the Mid-Sixties. Robert Moses’s presidency of the World’s Fair Corporation became another flash-point for the conflicts emerging in the spheres of civil rights, planning, architecture, and art in New York. Donald De Lue’s sculpture The Rocket Thrower illustrates the conflicts between Moses’s conservative aesthetic, the press, and the changing culture of the 1960′s. Explore the “space age” art and architecture that survives in Flushing Meadows today which recalls those times and their contradictory currents.

This tour is part of a weeklong festival celebrating the Rocket Thrower. The statue is included in the MAS’s Adopt-A-Monument program which through private funding conserves and maintains works of public art. The Rocket Thrower is the last of 36 outdoor monuments in this program waiting to be restored.

 

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Time: 12:00pm-2:00pm

Event Start/End: The East side of the Unisphere, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, opposite the Queens Museum of Art

Hosts: John Kriskiewicz, with John Krawchuk

Registration: No need to sign up, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Woodlawn in the Bronx: A Small Town in the Big City

Explore this well defined former village of Westchester County that retains many of its small-town elements — main street, churches, schools, post office, library, railroad station, green spaces — after being absorbed into the NYC grid more than 100 years ago. We’ll talk a bit about Woodlawn’s role in a Revolutionary War skirmish, its history as one of the Bronx’s “Irishtowns”, and its connection to NYC’s 19th-century aqueduct projects. But mostly we’ll walk across a portion of Woodlawn’s predominantly residential streets to illustrate how Jane Jacob’s philosophy of “well-used” city streets and sidewalks have preserved Woodlawn as a stable, safe, thriving urban neighborhood. We’ll end at a local venue for refreshments and conversation.

 

Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Event Start: East Side of Van Cortlandt Park E. and E. 242nd St, on island at flag pole

Event End: TBD

Host:  Allison Jaffe

Registration: No need to sign up, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks

Come spend the morning with Bed-Stuy community advocates, organizers and neighbors to learn more about the bountiful food and garden resources in our community! The tour will meet at St John’s Bread and Life for a snack and tour of their food pantry and then continue west to explore Bed-Stuy’s rich architectural history and active community gardens.

 

 

 

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Time: 10:00am-12:00pm

Event Start: St. John’s Bread and Life – 795 Lexington Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

Event End: Hattie Carthan Community Garden – Marcy Avenue between Lafayette Avenue and Clifton Place

Host: Patricia Magnuson, of the North East Brooklyn Housing Development Corp and sponsored by the Coalition for the Improvement of Bedford-Stuyvesant (CIBS) & the Bed-Stuy Food & Family Day Committee

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Bordering Canarsie, East Flatbush, Crown Heights, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and East New York, Brownsville has been and remains a working class neighborhood since its founding in 1880. We will see sights such as old Loew’s Pitkin Theater on Pitkin Avenue, Brownsville’s commercial artery and the Stone Avenue Branch of the Brooklyn Public LIbrary which opened in 1914 as the Brownsville Children’s Library, the world’s first public library devoted to children.

 

 

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Time: 10:00am-12:00pm

Event Start/End: 3 Train Stop at Rockaway and Livonia Ave

Host: Gerald A. Thomas, Managing Director of the Brownsville Partnership

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Preview the Demise of Yorkville and East Harlem

The city is proposing to build an industrial garbage facility at 91st and York (Asphalt Green) which will run 24 hours a day, 6 days a week and have the capacity to receive garbage from 500 trucks a day. The access to the facility will be on the driveway that bisects the playing field at Asphalt Green from the Swim and Athletic Center. Get a tour of the proposed truck routes and learn the facts about why the city decided to locate a garbage facility right next to an athletic facility that serves 50,000 children a year. Also try to understand why this facility is the only one of its type being built in a residential neighborhood – because we can’t.

 

Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Event Start: Le Pan Quotidien at 88th and Lexington

Event End: Vinegar Factory at 91st and York

Host: SaneTrash.org

Registration: No need to sign up, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks

Forget 16 Candles — Henry Street is lighting 145! The Henry Street Settlement will be celebrating the 145th birthday of our founder, Lillian Wald with an old-fashioned block party, free and open to all. In addition to old-fashioned street games for children, arts & crafts, music, refreshments and a birthday cake baking contest, Henry Street will be hosting walks through its 1832 historic headquarters (at 12:30, 1:30 and 2:30 PM)

 

 

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Time: 12:00pm-3:00pm

Event Start/End: 265 Henry Street (at Montgomery Street)

Host: Henry Street Settlement

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

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Downtown Loop

Take the Downtown Walk that new interns from all around the country take at the beginning of their “Urban Fellowship” with the City of New York. Imagine you’re new to this crazy, diverse, place and just learning about the City where you will be working in City Government for the next nine months.

 

 

 

 

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Event Start/End: Under the Arch of the Manhattan Municipal Building, One Centre Street, Manhattan.

Host: Mitch Paluszek

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting place.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks

Walk the High Line with Friends of the High Line (Pt. 2)

Completed all the way from Gansevoort Street to 30th Street in 2009, the High Line is Manhattan’s new park atop an elevated rail structure is one of the most innovative urban reclamation projects in memory. Led by Friends of the High Line Co-Founder, Robert Hammond, this walk is a wonderful to chance to hear how the High Line started with “two guys with no money and no plan” and a lot of friends to become one of New York’s great public spaces.

 

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Time: 5:00pm-6:00pm

Event Start: Gansevoort Plaza, at Gansevoort and Washington Streets in the Meatpacking District

Event End: TBD

Host: Robert Hammond, Co-Founder of Friends of the High Line

Registration: Park regulations permit a maximum of 20 people for group gatherings. Please email rbabb@mas.org to RSVP.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Walk the High Line with Friends of the High Line (Pt. 1)

Completed all the way from Gansevoort Street to 30th Street in 2009, the High Line is Manhattan’s new park atop an elevated rail structure is one of the most innovative urban reclamation projects in memory. Led by Friends of the High Line’s Emily Pinkowitz, this walk will be a great way to enjoy the park in the evening hours while hearing more on the gritty history of the West Side and the park’s wondrous variety of plantings.

 

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Time: 4:00pm-5:00pm

Event Start: Gansevoort Plaza, at Gansevoort and Washington Streets in the Meatpacking District

Event End: TBD

Host: Emily Pinkowitz, School & Youth Program Manager of Friends of the High Line

Registration: Park regulations permit a maximum of 20 people for group gatherings. Please email rbabb@mas.org to RSVP.

Accessibility: Fully Accessible

Historic Flushing (Queens): Colonists, Quakers, and Tree Nurseries

From the brave English settlers who defied tyrannical Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant in the name of religious tolerance, to the oldest house of worship in New York State, to the terrible sacrifice suffered by Declaration of Independence Signer Francis Lewis, Flushing has seen New York history unfold on its land since the 1600s. Find out where Thomas Jefferson shopped for trees for his beloved Monticello, and where Quaker founder George Fox preached to hundreds under the shade of two grand oak trees, all here in the erstwhile village once called the prettiest on Long Island.

*Please note: This tour is about Flushing from the 1600s through the early 20th century, not present-day Asian Flushing*

 

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Time: 1:00pm-3:00pm

Event Start: Meet outside the Burger King, near the corner of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue.

Event End: Outside the John Bowne House, 31-01 Bowne Street.

Host Organization: Linda McDonnell, Friendly Native New Yorker Tours

Registration: No need to sign up, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks

Once part of South Brooklyn, Red Hook now combines elements of its long history with more recent trends in neighborhood change. Industry, working class housing, and maritime activity dating from the 19th century and New Deal projects like Red Hook Houses and the Goldman pool contrast with new arrivals such as boutiques and restaurants, repurposed warehouses hosting art galleries and New York institutions like Fairway, and the big box Ikea. Development tradeoffs have brought new waterside parks while vacant plots await further development. We will end at Red Hook Park where lunch can be purchased from the Red Hook Food Vendors, Ecuadoran, Columbian, and Mexican immigrants whose success adds another chapter to Red Hook’s history.

 

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012

Time: 10:00am-12:30pm

Event Start: Corners of Atlantic Avenue and Court Street, on the Atlantic Ave. side of Trader Joe’s

Event End: Red Hook Park

Host: Deborah Gardner, of the Roosevelt House at Hunter College

Registration: No need to RSVP, just show up at the posted meeting location.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks.

Transit Walk: The Transformation of Downtown Brooklyn

Public transit has defined and transformed New York City over and over again. Delve into one rich example by taking a close look at Downtown Brooklyn through the lens of mass transit. Led by educators from the New York Transit Museum, we’ll visit Court Street, Columbus Park, the commercial center at Fulton Mall, and the Transit Museum itself. Explore, observe, and discuss the impact of transit progress on this community. The tour concludes with complimentary admission to the New York Transit Museum, light refreshments, and an informal discussion. Located in an authentic 1930s subway station, the New York Transit Museum presents hands-on exhibits that celebrate the many ways that public transportation impacts New York City and its environs.

 

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012

Time: 10:00am-12:00pm

Event Start: Pierrepont Playground at Columbia Heights and Pierrepont Streets (on the Brooklyn Heights Promenade)

Event End: New York Transit Museum

Host Organization: New York Transit Museum

Registration: There is a limit of 25 participants. Click here to register.

Accessibility: This event is accessible and welcoming to wheelchairs, bicycles, children, & seniors.

Take a tour of this historic theater where John Philip Sousa started the first musicians union, where the early ILGWU meetings were held right after the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, where Emma Goldman, the anarchist, spoke here before being deported. In the thirties it was a Yiddish theater, in the forties it was home to famed African American choreographer Katharine Dunham, in the fifties it served as a television studio for early crime dramas, in the 60′s it reverted to a theater and hosted Channel One Theater (which spawned Chevy Chase and The Groove Tube movie), in the late sixties it hosted Andy Warhols Boys To Adore Galore porn films, and in the early 70′s Francis Ford Coppola filmed the famous operetta sequence of Godfather 2. Now housing the DMAC- Duo Multicultural Arts Center, 62 E 4th St. has a long, rich history as a center of social movements, and entertainment.


*This walk will be happening on both May 5th, and May 6th

Date: Saturday May 5, 2012
Time: 2:00pm-2:30pm

Date: Sunday May 6, 2012
Time: 12:00pm-12:30pm

Event Start/End: 62 East 4th Street

Host: Michelangelo Alasa

Registration: No need to register, just show up at the starting location.

Accessibility: Partially Accessible – curbs, uneven terrain, busy sidewalks

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Jane Jacobs Walk
375 South 1530 East #235
Salt Lake City, Utah 84112

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